Sea Salt and Water
Is Salt Good, or Bad for Us?

sea salt harvesting

There are many benefits of sea salt for our health, but the combination of salt and water is essential for our life. Together they keep our body hydrated and the vital functions of it working normally.

We all know already that our body is 75% water.
What maybe not all of us know, is that this water contained in all of our tissues, cells, blood, etc. is a salty water solution, very similar to that of the ocean. There should be no wonder about this, since we know that the life on Earth started from the sea.
So, why are we often told that salt is not good for our health? - Let's see:

Sea Salt and Water

As I'm showing in the benefit of drinking water page, we need minerals and trace elements for the electrolytic process that keeps our body alive. These are mainly: sodium, chloride, potassium, and bicarbonate.

As per Dr F. Batmanghelidj MD, it is not the salt that causes us health problems, but the failure of drinking enough water.

That means we need salt as well as we need water.

BTW: you should go grab a tall glass of water! And keep repeating that motion; if you have to go to the hospital for dehydration, you're out $350 - the price of administrating an intravenous saline water solution :)

Notice that the vegetables we eat don't contain sodium chloride (the regular salt), so we need to take it separately. But what kind of salt should we eat?

Table Salt vs. Sea Salt

The thing is, there is a difference between the common table salt we buy in stores and the natural salt. Well, chemically speaking there isn't any - they are both sodium chloride (NaCl2). However...

Table Salt

table saltThe salt we normally use may come from salt mines or from the sea. The so called "table salt" though, is a refined product, initially made for industrial use.

The process of producing it consist mainly in boiling and then drying the salt at high heat.

The result is a substance hard on the body, that contributes to high blood pressure, heart trouble and kidney disease, among other health problems.

It often contains additives like aluminum that makes it powdery and porous.

Advocates of big industrial salt producers claim that sodium chloride as a chemical substance is the same as natural salt, and it's safe for the human consumption - but is it?

- To me this is exactly the same as with so many other artificial foods sold to us (and labelled "natural") leading to so many health problems in our society today, including obesity...

Natural, unrefined sea salt

Unrefined Sea Salt
Harvesting sea salt

All types of salt in their unprocessed form contain vital minerals and trace elements that our body needs - remember, our blood composition is similar to that of the sea water.

Apparently, it is not the presence of sodium chloride that is unhealthy for us but the absence of the other minerals that keep our electro balance stable.

You should be aware of the fact that many table salts labeled "sea salt" are washed or boiled, which removes minerals and trace elements from the salt. These salts are toxic to the body. Beware of "Sea salt" labels. Source: "Health Miracles in Water & Salt , by Dr. Batmanghelidj's

Iodine in salt

The real salt is not rich in iodine.

Some countertop table salts have added synthetic iodine as a chemical component, which doesn't have anything in common with the natural iodine that our body needs.

The fact is that we do need iodine in our diet. This element, in its natural form, is mandatory for the thyroid gland, which controls many vital functions in our body - You should consult your doctor about the amount of iodine your body needs.

* Iodine should be added to your diet only from natural iodine rich foods (like seafood), or supplements.

How much salt is safe?

Don't overdue on Salt!

According to Dr. Batmanghelidj, as a general rule we need about 1/4 teaspoon of salt (3-4 grams) for 10 cups of water.

*You should always consult your doctor about this.

Let's see, what are the benefits of sea salt for our health?

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